Israel-Palestine News Compiler

Amnesty International Report: Operation Cast Lead – 22 Days of Death and Destruction

Posted in 1 by beyondtheborder on August 19, 2009

“Soldiers came to the area at night [on 3  January 2009] and at dawn on 4 January many relatives came to my house to stay with us.  We though that if we stayed in our house we would be all right. After a while soldiers came to  the house and my father spoke to them in Hebrew; he told them: ‘These are my children, my  family, there are no terrorists here.’ The soldiers told us to leave our house and go to Wa’el’s  house across the road and we obeyed. We were many relatives, about 100 altogether, many of them children. We stayed there all day and all night. We had hardly any food in the house  and the children were hungry. Nobody could come to the area, not even ambulances. We were scared. The following morning (5 January) three of my cousins and I tried to go out of  the house, to the walled garden to get some tomatoes and some wood to cook something. As  soon as we got out of the door we were shelled. My cousins Muhammad and Hamdi were  killed and Wa’el and I were injured and we retreated back into the house. Then the house was shelled again – at least two shells – from above. Some 25 people were killed and most of
the others were injured. My little girl, Azza, was killed and my wife was injured. My mother Rahma was holding baby Mahmoud (six months old) and she was killed but she shielded the  baby with her body and saved him. My father was killed. Wa’el’s children, a boy and a girl, were both killed. Safa, the wife of my brother Iyad, was killed and Maha, the wife of my brother Hilmi, and their baby son Muhammad were all killed. Why did they shell the house after having put us all in there? We thought we’d all be killed; those of us who could ran out  of the house. Many of us were injured; I was injured in the head and blood was pouring down  my face as I ran. Nearby there were soldiers in the house of the Sawafiri family and they shouted to us to go back and shot at us, but we kept running. When we got to safety we raised the alarm, called the Red Cross to send an ambulance to the house to get the injured, but the army did not let any ambulances approach the area. We knew there were people still alive in the house because we called the mobile numbers and children answered; they were scared, with dead bodies all around them. Some of the injured died in the house waiting to be rescued. Only three days later could the Red Cross go in, but only on foot as the army did not let the ambulances approach; they found some children still alive and many others dead.”

For full report, click here.

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